THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/BOSTON

 

Press Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact
Joyce Linehan
617-298-0200
joyce@ashmontmedia.com
 

ICA ANNOUNCES FALL 2013 PERFORMANCE, PROGRAMS AND FILM

Highlights include Fashion Designers Proenza Schouler, Performer and Filmmaker Miranda July,
Choreographer Karole Armitage, and Free Artist Lectures

High res photos available upon request
 

(BOSTON--Aug. 16, 2013) The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston (ICA) presents ambitious performing arts programming for Fall 2013, including groundbreaking dance, theater, music and talks, as well as an eclectic and provocative film and video schedule. All programs take place in the Barbara Lee Family Foundation Theater unless otherwise noted. Tickets for these programs go on sale to ICA Associate-level members and above on Aug. 20 and to the general public on Aug. 22, and can be purchased at www.icaboston.org or by calling the ICA Box Office at (617) 478-3103. The 2013–14 performance season at the ICA is presented with support from The Robert E. Davoli and Eileen L. McDonagh Charitable Foundation and Ellen Poss.

Sept. 13, 7:30 p.m.
MUSIC
Zola Jesus with J.G. Thirlwell

Nika Roza Danilova, better known by stage moniker Zola Jesus, explores the dueling archetypes of darkness and light with gothic, brooding beats and ghostly, ethereal vocals. With industrial musician and composer J.G. Thirlwell and the New York–based Mivos String Quartet.
$20, $18 members and students

Sept. 19, 6:30 p.m.
ARTIST TALK
Steve Locke with Evan Garza

Steve Locke joins Evan Garza—curator, writer, and co-founder of Fire Island Artist Residency (FIAR)—in an engaging conversation about objects, paintings, the male figure in art, and the “undead in contemporary painting.”
Free tickets are required and available on day of program. First come, first served.

Sept. 26, 6:30 p.m.
ARTIST TALK
Proenza Schouler

Designers Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez discuss the designs and inspirations for their distinctive clothing brand, Proenza Schouler—including the Himalayan region of Nepal; the coy urban youth culture of New York; and artists Cy Twombly, Mark Rothko, and Gerhard Richter—with Helen Molesworth, Barbara Lee Chief Curator.
$20, $15 members and students

Sept. 27, 7 p.m.
FILM
Unbound, Scenes from the Life of Mary Shelley (New England Premiere)
Filmed in Italy with amateur actors, this experimental feature film explores the lives of Percy Bysshe Shelley and his second wife, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley—writers who forecast the modern in their concern for women, free love, and labor—in the form of an imaginary home movie. Filmmaker Abigail Child will be present at the screening.
$10, $5 members and students

Sept. 28, 7 p.m.
Sept. 29, 5 p.m.
FILM
Art Over Politics: The Persistence of Dreams
SALMA (New England Premiere)

A film by Kim Longinotto, 2013, 89 min.
Locked away at puberty by protective Tamil Muslim parents, Salma, now one of South India’s most important literary figures, refused to let years of imprisonment quell the voice she secretly nurtured. Beautiful imagery and an evocative score accentuate the unfolding narrative in this new documentary.
$10, $5 members and students (Part of a series, see also Oct. 26, 27 and Nov. 3.)

Oct. 5, 1-4 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENT
Pop-Up ‘Zine Library

Poss Family Mediatheque
‘Zines are small, self-published magazines distributed to share ideas not often represented in mainstream media. Amy Sillman started her ‘zine, the O.G., as “a kind of translation device” for her paintings. Explore a selection of ‘zines from Cambridge’s Papercut ‘Zine Library, and hear from Papercut’s volunteer librarians about ‘zines they know and love. Cambridge’s Papercut ‘Zine Library is a fully functioning lending library, run by volunteer librarians, with over 14,000 ‘zines, independent newspapers, books, magazines, and audio/visual works. It is housed at Lorem Ipsum Books at 1299 Cambridge St. Free with museum admission.

Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m.
MUSIC
Ben Sollee

Co-presented with World Music/CRASHarts
Kentucky-based singer-songwriter-cellist Ben Sollee is known for unconventional playing and inventive, intricate arrangements. In a recent Lincoln Center performance, “Appalachian mountain music gave way to the blues, and one song was appended with a fragment from a Bach cello suite, beautifully played” (New York Times).
$18, $15 members and students

Oct. 5, 7:30 p.m.
THEATER
Miranda July: SOCIETY
Oct. 6, 2 p.m.
Miranda July: LOST CHILD!

As a performer, writer, and filmmaker, Miranda July mines the banal and mundane elements of our lives for humor, lyrical beauty, and surprising poignancy. In SOCIETY, an experiment in collaboration, she blends fiction and real life, intertwining the histories and talents of the audience with a startling chronicle of time, love, and group faith. LOST CHILD!—part retrospective, part artist lecture, and part interactive performance—hilariously spans her extraordinary trajectory, from fledgling artist in Portland, Oregon, to award-winning filmmaker and best-selling author.
Each show: $30, $15 members and students

Oct. 10, 6:30 p.m.
ARTIST TALK
Mary Reid Kelley with Jenelle Porter

Mary Reid Kelley’s video works feature reimagined historical narratives told in a sing-song rhyme, the latest interpreting a Greek myth as a church volleyball tournament. Join her for a discussion about her work with Jenelle Porter, ICA Mannion Family Senior Curator.
Free tickets are required and available on day of program. First come, first served.

Oct. 18, 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 19, 8 p.m.
Oct. 20, 3 p.m.
DANCE
Armitage Gone! Dance: Ligeti Essays and Rave (Boston Premiere)

Co-presented with World Music/CRASHarts
Dubbed the “Punk Ballerina” in the '80s and recently nominated for a Tony Award for choreography for the Broadway musical Hair, Karole Armitage is known for pushing boundaries. Rave, a celebratory happening for 26 dancers, including 18 outstanding students from the Boston Conservatory, mixes dance, capoeira, voguing, Chinese martial arts, catwalk, iconic costumes, and body paint; Ligeti Essays is a poetic journey set to jewel-like song cycles by the late György Ligeti.
This performance contains nudity. $45, $50 members and students

Pre-performance conversations with Debra Cash will be held in the Bank of America Art Lab thirty minutes before curtain all three performances; Q&As will start directly afterward. Open to all ticket holders.

Oct. 26, 7 p.m.
Oct. 27, 3 p.m.
FILM
Art Over Politics: The Persistence of Dreams
THE DESERT OF FORBIDDEN ART

Film by Amanda Pope and Tchavdar Georgiev, 2010, 80 min., in English and Russian with English subtitles.
During Soviet rule, artists who stayed true to their vision were executed or sent to mental hospitals or gulags. Their plight inspired curator Igor Savitsky, who pretended to buy state-approved art but instead daringly rescued 40,000 works by forbidden artists and created a museum for them in the Uzbekistan desert. Narrated by Ben Kingsley, Sally Field, and Ed Asner, The Desert of Forbidden Art showcases an inspiring dedication to art and stunning works.
$10, $5 members and students
(Part of a series, see also Sept. 28, 29 and Nov. 3)

Nov. 2,  2 p.m.
GALLERY TALK
Charles Bernstein

Poet Charles Bernstein has collaborated with Amy Sillman on several projects. Their Duplexities, a set of 100 images and poems, recently appeared in Art in America. Bernstein addresses key images in Sillman’s work with commentary on their collaborations.
Free with museum admission

Nov. 3, 3 p.m.
FILM
Art Over Politics: The Persistence of Dreams
UNFINISHED SPACES

A film by Alysa Nahmias and Benjamin Murray, 86 min., in Spanish with English subtitles.
An exceptional documentary about Cuba’s ambitious National Art Schools project, designed by three young artists in the wake of Castro’s revolution, then neglected, nearly forgotten, and ultimately rediscovered as a visionary architectural masterpiece. Forty years later the schools are in use, but remain unfinished and decaying, while Castro has invited the exiled architects back to finish their unrealized dream.
$10, $5 members and students
(Part of a series, see also Sept. 28, 29 and Oct. 26, 27)

Nov. 8, 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m.
DANCE
Adele Myers and Dancers: Einstein’s Happiest Thought (Boston Premiere)

Inspired in part by Myers’s attempt to get over her fear of heights by enrolling in trapeze school, Einstein’s Happiest Thought is a multidisciplinary work that delves into the charged physical states of risk and anticipation. Directed and choreographed by Myers for her company of four, the work features collaborating composer Josh Quillen of SO Percussion.
$20, $10 members and students

Pre-performance conversations with Myers, Quillen and David Henry, ICA’s Director of Programs, will be held in the lobby 30 minutes before curtain both nights; Q&As will start directly afterward.

The presentation of Einstein’s Happiest Thought was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Access for Boston's dance community is supported in part by the Pratt-Hall Fund.

Nov. 10, 12:30, 2:30 p.m., 5:30 p.m.
FILM
The Boston Jewish Film Festival

The Boston Jewish Film Festival, celebrating its 25th anniversary from Nov. 6–18 at various locations around the Boston area, is proud to bring a special program of the best Jewish films from around the world to the ICA. For more information, please visit www.bjff.org.

Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m.
Nov. 16, 8 p.m.
Nov. 17, 3 p.m.
DANCE
World Music/CRASHarts at the ICA presents
Stephen Petronio Company: Like Lazarus Did (Boston Premiere)
Widely regarded as one of the leading dance makers of his generation, Stephen Petronio produces powerfully modern landscapes for the senses incorporating new music, visual art and fashion. Petronio’s newest work, Like Lazarus Did, brings together his athletic dancers, an original score by Son Lux, and visual inspiration by artist Janine Antoni to explore themes of death and resurrection, transformation and rebirth.
$50, $45 members and students

Pre-show talks with dance critic Debra Cash (all shows) and post-show Q&A with the company (Nov. 15) free to all ticket holders.

This presentation of Stephen Petronio Company was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts' National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Nov. 16, 1-4 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENT
Pop-Up ‘Zine Library

Poss Family Mediatheque
‘Zines are small, self-published magazines distributed to share ideas not often represented in mainstream media. Amy Sillman started her ‘zine, the O.G., as “a kind of translation device” for her paintings. Explore a selection of ‘zines from Cambridge’s Papercut ‘Zine Library, and hear from Papercut’s volunteer librarians about ‘zines they know and love. Cambridge’s Papercut ‘Zine Library is a fully functioning lending library, run by volunteer librarians, with over 14,000 ‘zines, independent newspapers, books, magazines, and audio/visual works. It is housed at Lorem Ipsum Books at 1299 Cambridge St. Free with museum admission.

Nov. 21, 7–8 p.m.
ARTIST TALK
Amy Sillman with Helen Molesworth

Amy Sillman returns to Boston for a conversation with Helen Molesworth, Barbara Lee Chief Curator at the ICA. Hear the artist’s thoughts on what Molesworth calls “her commitment to drawing” and the many influences and inspirations behind the works in Amy Sillman: one lump or two.
Free tickets are required and available on day of program. First come, first served.

 

About ICA Film/Video
ICA Film and Video presents an adventurous selection of the best of regional, national and international cinema, experimental and independent film, video, and digital media. In addition to programming works inspired by the museum's acclaimed exhibitions, the ICA collaborates and co-presents with several major film festivals, and presents retrospectives by important contemporary artists. The ICA has presented world, U.S. and regional premieres, including sneak previews of highly anticipated films, and conversations with filmmakers, film scholars and critics.

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About the ICA
An influential forum for multi-disciplinary arts, the Institute of Contemporary Art has been at the leading edge of art in Boston for 75 years. Like its iconic building on Boston's waterfront, the ICA offers new ways of engaging with the world around us. Its exhibitions and programs provide access to contemporary art, artists, and the creative process, inviting audiences of all ages and backgrounds to participate in the excitement of new art and ideas. The ICA, located at 100 Northern Avenue, is open Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 am - 5 pm; Thursday and Friday, 10 am - 9 pm; and Saturday and Sunday, 10 am - 5 pm. Admission is $15 adults, $13 seniors and $10 students, and free for members and children 17 and under. State Street Corporation Free Admission for Youth at the ICA is generously supported by the State Street Corporation. Free admission on ICA Free Thursday Nights, 5—9 p.m. Free admission for families at ICA Play Dates (2 adults accompanied by children 12 and under) on the last Saturday of the month. For more information, call 617-478-3100 or visit our Web site at www.icaboston.org. The official hotel sponsor of the ICA is the Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel.
 

 

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