THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/BOSTON

PRESS RELEASE

DAVE MULLER EXPLORES ART AND MUSIC IN A NEW WORK FOR THE ICA'S
SANDRA AND GERALD FINEBERG ART WALL

Los Angeles-based artist Dave Muller will create the second work for the Sandra and Gerald Fineberg Art Wall at the Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston. The Art Wall is dedicated to monumental, site-specific works by leading contemporary artists, commissioned annually. Located along the eastern interior wall of the museum's glass-enclosed lobby, the most public space in the museum, the Art Wall is the visitors' first encounter with art work as they enter the building. Muller's work will be on view from November 14, 2007 to October 12, 2008.

"Dave Muller's work is approachable, visually stunning, and conceptually playful," says Jill Medvedow, Director of the Institute of Contemporary Art. "It is fitting for the Sandra and Gerald Fineberg Art Wall, which engages our audiences the moment they step inside the ICA."

Muller's work revolves around the collective experience of art and music. The artist's background as a DJ informs his visual art practice: his installations of large-scale acrylic drawings and long-play sound works often "sample" and "mix" images and recordings by other artists and musicians. For the ICA, Muller presents a timeline of rock 'n' roll history-including the Righteous Brothers, the Beatles, and the Supremes-as a vast landscape with layered roots and outgrowths. The installation will also incorporate new acrylic drawings inspired by concert listings and reviews of the Boston music scene, as well as a non-repeating soundtrack timed for the entire length of the exhibition.

"Muller's innovative compositions invite us to recognize and identify with key figures and genres of music," says Assistant Curator Jen Mergel. "He illustrates the power of art and music to build connections or make distinctions, both social and cultural."

In 2004, Muller began a new series of wall drawing installations incorporating a diagrammatic timeline of rock 'n' roll found in Reebee Garofalo and Steve Chapple’s book Rock ‘n’ Roll Is Here to Pay (1977). Reproduced in epic scale and depth, Muller's version of this lineage chart becomes a landscape, cut in cross-section and wryly illustrated with trees and plants sprouting from those decades with particularly "fertile" growth. These wall drawings often include framed illustrations of iconic imagery such as glittering disco balls and colorful album spines; audio soundtracks add further conceptual, textural, and sensory levels to the work.

Dave Muller was born in 1964 in San Francisco. A graduate of the University of California, Davis (B.A.S. Chemistry & Art, 1989), he studied at the School of Visual Arts, New York (1990-91) before receiving his M.F.A from California Institute of the Arts, Valencia (1993). His recent solo museum exhibitions include Current 85, Dave Muller: Spatial at the Saint Louis Art Museum (2001); Dave Muller: Connections at the Center for Curatorial Studies Museum, Bard College, New York, and the UCLA Hammer Museum, Los Angeles (2002-2003); and a forthcoming show at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León, Spain (2008). A participant in major biennials including the 7th and 8th Biennale d'Art Contemporain, Lyon, France (2003 and 2005) and the 2004 Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Muller has also been featured in significant group exhibitions, including Made in California: Now at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (2000); L.A. On My Mind at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2002); A Molecular History of Everything at the Australian Center for Contemporary Art, Victoria, Australia (2004); Playlist at Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2004); and Likeness: Portraits of Artists by Other Artists at the California College of the Arts, San Francisco, and the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2004)

Translate this site: Español, Français, Deutsch, Nederlands, Italiano,       ,           ,             
Automatic translations are provided by a third party and may contain inaccuracies.