THE INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART/BOSTON


Tara Donovan

BORN 1969 | NEW YORK, NY
 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





Currently, this work is not on view to the public.

Untitled (Pins), 2003
Size #17 straight pins
42 x 42 x 42 inches
Promised gift of Barbara Lee


Tara Donovan, the subject of 2008 solo exhibition at the ICA, transforms everyday, disposable materials into formally elegant sculptures, installations, and works on paper. Untitled (Pins) is made from thousands of commonplace silver straight pins. Formed into a perfect cube, it calls to mind the work of Minimalists like Donald Judd. In contrast to his industrially created objects, Donovan makes this piece by pouring boxes upon boxes of pins into a four-sided mold. Once the sides are removed, the pins keep a cube shape, bound by nothing more than gravity.

 


Currently, this work is not on view to the public.

Nebulous, 2008
Cellulose adhesive tape
Purchased through funds provided by the Board of Trustees in honor of Jill Medvedow’s 10th anniversary as ICA Director, 2008

Nebulous appears like a mist growing from the gallery floor. The work’s title hints at the uncertain perceptual experience created with none other than “invisible” and “magic” Scotch tape. Tara Donovan looped innumerable sticky strands into shapes she calls “hills” and “flats” to make the irregular airy weave that hovers at our feet. As she explains: “My work might appear ‘organic’ or ‘alive’ specifically because my process mimics, in the most elementary sense, basic systems of growth found in nature.”


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Currently, this work is not on view to the public.

Untitled (Rubber Bands), 2006
Relief print from rubber bands matrix
Image: 36 ½ x 24 ¾ inches
Paper: 38 ½ x 26 inches
Version 30 of 35
Gift of Bruce A. Beal and Robert L. Beal in honor of Barbara Krakow


Untitled (Rubber Bands) is another example of Donovan’s unique use of common materials, here, in the service of printmaking. Rather than traditional printmaking tools, Donovan made this image with hundreds of rubber bands. The resulting black and white image is hypnotic, its dense, looping forms recalling the weave of a rug.

 


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